(Using sanette's python script) How does testdisk rename files and organize subdirectories?

Using PhotoRec to recover lost data
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melodie
Posts: 11
Joined: 26 Dec 2018, 15:38

(Using sanette's python script) How does testdisk rename files and organize subdirectories?

#1 Post by melodie » 02 Jan 2019, 14:57

Hello,

after retrieving a lot of files from a image.dd created by tesdisk, I am trying to use sanette's python script to try to make sense among the retrieved files.

Photorec organized the saved files in subdirectories named from "recup_dir.1" to "recup_dir.58". The files are of various extentions such as .txt, .odt, .doc, .mp4, .mp3, .mov, and also some I know much less : .3gp and .m2ts, (video), and also others, sqlite, gz and so on…

the python script, automatically rename files after photorec, using the command line as

Code: Select all

python ./rename_by_content.py --log log-renamebycontent.txt --output _RECUP_DIR.2 recup_dir.1/*


although not able to give back human readable to the files, except a very little number of them, interestingly saves the files in new directories by year, which could help the owner of the files get some organisation in the retrieved files.

Now I wonder this: If there aren't 2 or more files having the same name in different directories (ie : faaa111.jpg in recup_dir.1, recup_dir.3, recup_dir.37), then I could use the python script this way to merge files by year, this way:

after:

Code: Select all

python ./rename_by_content.py --log log-renamebycontent.txt --output _RECUP_DIR.2 recup_dir.1/*


I will do:

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python ./rename_by_content.py --log log-renamebycontent.txt --output _RECUP_DIR.2 recup_dir.2/*


then:

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python ./rename_by_content.py --log log-renamebycontent.txt --output _RECUP_DIR.2 recup_dir.3/*


then

Code: Select all

python ./rename_by_content.py --log log-renamebycontent.txt --output _RECUP_DIR.2 recup_dir.4/*


and so on until the last one:

Code: Select all

python ./rename_by_content.py --log log-renamebycontent.txt --output _RECUP_DIR.2 recup_dir.58/*


then in the destination directory, _RECUP_DIR.2 the files would all be ordered by year?

For now, after processing this way for recup_dir.1 and recup_dir.2, here is what I find in the dest dir:
$ ls -l
total 140
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:34 1900
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:43 2000
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:44 2006
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:44 2010
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:44 2011
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 4096 janv. 2 12:45 2012
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 4096 janv. 2 12:44 2013
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:44 2015
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:46 2016
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:42 2017
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:43 2018
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 135168 janv. 2 14:36 Unknown_year
and, for example, in the 2006 directory:
$ ls -l 2006
total 0
drwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 0 janv. 2 12:44 Unknown_month
$ ls -l 2006/Unknown_month/
total 4
-rwxrwxrwx 1 fluffy1 fluffy1 1886 janv. 1 19:52 _rtf1_ansi_ansicpg1252_deff0_deflang1036_fonttbl_f0_fswiss_fcharset0_Arial_.rtf
$
This is my question : how has testdisk created the filenames? I mean : in each of the "recup_dir.*" directory, are all the files having different names, from one directory to the other? If I proceed as presented above, is there a risk that several files might bear the same name and overwrite some other file?

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